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CT_Scan
A CT scan, sometimes called a CAT scan, combines x-ray technology and computer technology to produce detailed images of bones, organs, blood vessels, and other internal structures and tissues. In a conventional x-ray, the rays pass through your body and the image is recorded, creating a single image for each x-ray that is taken. In a CT scan, multiple images provide a cross-sectional, multi-dimensional view that offers much more clarity and detail.

For a CT scan, you'll lie on a table that moves into a tunnel containing the equipment that produces and detects the x-rays. The technologist will position you to get the best images of the area of concern, and you may be given pillows or straps to help you stay in position. You may also be given a contrast material intravenously or orally. As you move through the tunnel, you'll hear a slight clicking or buzzing as the x-ray equipment rotates, taking cross-section images of your body that are displayed on a computer monitor. At times you may be asked to hold your breath briefly to ensure the clarity of the images. The procedure is usually completed in about 30 minutes. CT scans are painless, non-invasive, and provide detailed information on many types of tissue, including soft tissue and blood vessels. In some cases, a CT scan may eliminate the need for exploratory surgery or biopsy.

 

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